Sprachenatelier Berlin

Friedrichshain and Kreuzberg

The Sprachenatelier Berlin building is situated on Frankfurter Allee. This road is popular among shoppers and commuters alike, being the longest and busiest street in Friedrichshain and one of the oldest in Berlin. The Friedrichshain area, which is bordered by the Volkspark on the north and the Spree river on the south, is home to many of the city's most famous and culturally important sites. Together with the multicultural area of Kreuzberg, south of the Spree, it is regarded as the second most important district in Berlin.

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, many (primarily left-wing) squatters took over empty and delapidated buildings in the more traditional, eastern areas of the city. The police ended this squatting trend in the1990s. However, the social and cultural significance of the squatted houses still remains in Friedrichshain today, contributing to the lively atmosphere of its many bars, clubs, cinemas and cultural meeting places. The exciting legacy of the area is also a reason why students and tourists are so attracted to it, perhaps hoping to experience the post-wall Berlin scene for themselves.

Since the end of the 1990s the area around the Simon-Dach-Straße has become a popular meeting place for the youth of Berlin. The bar, café and pub scene and small, boutique shops flourish in this area, attracting people from all over Berlin and the world. The Boxhagener Platz, just off the Simon-Dach-Straße, is also very popular and is considered a must-see when visiting Friedrichshain.

The district of Kreuzberg is divided by two very famous postcodes: SW 61 (South West) and SO 36 (South East). The latter applies to the smaller area of Kreuzberg, home to many low-income citizens. Above all, the area of Kreuzberg 36 is important due to its moving historical legacy and is famous regionally for having been bordered on three sides by the Berlin Wall, prior to its fall. As a result of this, an entirely new and original alternative culture emerged in this area.

In the 70s and 80s, the area of Kreuzberg was the social centre for squatters and activists. Today it is home to 160,000 citizens, a third of whom are immigrants, primarily of Turkish origin. The district is famous as a result of this demographic anomalie, even outside of Berlin. The centre of the Turkish community in this area is mainly situated around Wrangelstraße in the East of Kreuzberg. The people of Kreuzberg pride themselves on their multicultural reputation, creating a unique and diverse mix of people and a lively atmosphere. The area is ever-changing, and is currently undergoing urban gentrification as wealthier people move into the area and the economy improves. As a result, this area also contains a range of places of interest, such as quaint cafés, cool clubs, bars and cinemas. It is also the most popular shopping area in the Friedrichshain/Kreuzberg district.

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